In sophomore year of college, I needed an internship and my advisor had just the place: Posture Interactive. They were this hip place downtown that did graphic design, web design, and “interactive things,” whatever that meant. So we got in touch, and I went downtown a week later for an interview. I had no idea what to expect, I was young, still believed that the path of a graphic designer was a fairly straightforward one. I got all dressed up in a pair of shined loafers, and an oxford button up, and headed downtown. I was greeted by a grungy looking, 30 something with a snapback hat, offered a beer or coffee and plopped in a colorful conference room. If I wasn’t nervous enough, the variety of people I met in the next half-hour was enough to muddle my image of a modern workplace and give me butterflies in my stomach.

I was greeted by a grungy looking, 30 something with a snapback hat, offered a beer or coffee and plopped in a colorful conference room.


Over the next few months, I got to work with almost everyone in the office, and it changed my perspective of a creative workplace. I had a preconceived notion that everyone had to be similar to work together, but that was completely shattered. Even now years later as a team member, I still don’t completely understand how so many people work together so well.

I had a preconceived notion that everyone had to be similar to work together, but that was completely shattered.


Posture Interactive is a multifaceted and talented group of individuals, striving together towards highly creative and quality solutions to a variety of problems that are handed to them daily. You have designers, developers, partners, and all the skills people don’t even get put in their job description. The skills are completely varied, not a single person in this office has the same schedule, skill set, or life outlook. Among so many people there are miscommunications, loud discussions, and plenty of awkward moments, so one has to ask themselves sometimes why people work together? The answer: They care about what they do.


As I’ve started working with everyone in the office regularly and talking with them about their projects you start to learn a little about why the company works. Most recently, I worked on a writing a case study for a complex solution to a problem the team solved some months ago. It’s funny hearing what they have to say about it, watching their faces change, and how they talk about what they do. There are slight smirks, daydream glances, and run on sentences that expand into nothing except a faint smile. People often hide how much they care about what they do. It’s hard to really show people what you really care about but. You can’t hide it when you talk about it. Even if it’s small, there’s a bit of spark that shows through.


There are slight smirks, daydream glances, and run on sentences that expand into nothing except a faint smile. People often hide how much they care about what they do.

 

I believe it’s hard to care about something, because of all the obstacles that lay ahead when you set out to achieve a goal. There’s your own creativity to overcome: to just come up with some type of solution, that fits the needs of the project and does so in a beautiful way. When you care about something, the obstacles feel too personal, so it becomes easy to disassociate yourself from the project, make it something separate from your identity. You really can’t do it completely though. When you finish something, there will always be a part of yourself in that project, that logo, or that solution that you will be proud of. When you pass a logo on the street that you did, you’ll smile, if not only internally. You can’t deny yourself that satisfaction, just like you can’t deny yourself the defeating roadblocks that come with caring about something.

The same driving factor behind building a bridge to connect foreign cities drives a team of multifaceted individuals to become a team.


So the question still begs to be answered: what makes people work together? Is it the free coffee (or beer) they get at work, or that social interaction between coworkers. I think those are important, but they don’t satisfy the question. People work together for something because they care about it. The same driving factor behind building a bridge to connect foreign cities drives a team of multifaceted individuals to become a team. Through all the miscommunications there’s a drive to make something greater than themselves: a solution, big or small for the world (or a client).


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